Twitter for change

More often social media are being used in the battle for human rights. Not so long ago CNN found a video on YouTube about an 8 year old bride. The story got worldwide exposure which eventually lead to the discontinuation of the marriage. The video was placed by Saudi activist Wajeha al-Huwaider.

With these kind of success stories in mind the in Beirut-based organization Social Media Exchange (SMEX) tries to impose social change and sustainability. That, in a way, basically means: courses in Twitter, Facebook workshops and blog-lessons. For everybody, but especially for people who want to be heard, like Wajeha.

SMEX is founded by Jessica Dheere and Mohamad Najem. “It is important that people themselves can make journalistic reports for society-focused organizations and international websites. That’s how they can raise their voice”, says Dheere. “By sharing knowledge and experiences these women teach each other to use ICT in a smart way.” Next to providing workshops and training SMEX also translates tutorials for Twitter and Facebook in Arabic.

Source: Metro

Powerpoint makes us stupid

“PowerPoint makes us stupid,” General James N. Mattis of the Marine Corps, the Joint Forces commander, said this month at a military conference in North Carolina. General Stanley A. McChrystal, the leader of American and NATO forces in Afghanistan, was shown a PowerPoint slide in Kabul last summer that was meant to portray the complexity of American military strategy, but looked more like a bowl of spaghetti”, according to an article in the New York Times.

The slide in case was indeed a colorful resemblance of a highway in Rome during rush hour.

“When we understand that slide, we’ll have won the war,” General McChrystal dryly remarked, one of his advisers recalled, as the room erupted in laughter”, the article continues.

“Despite such tales, “death by PowerPoint,” the phrase used to described the numbing sensation that accompanies a 30-slide briefing, seems here to stay. The program, which first went on sale in 1987 and was acquired by Microsoft soon afterward, is deeply embedded in a military culture that has come to rely on PowerPoint’s hierarchical ordering of a confused world.”

And let’s not forget the closing paragraph: “The news media sessions often last 25 minutes, with 5 minutes left at the end for questions from anyone still awake. Those types of PowerPoint presentations, Dr. Hammes said, are known as “hypnotizing chickens.”

Are you hypnotizing chickens, or are you inspiring?

Full article here.


Innovative ways to deliver your message..eehh…massage

You All know Paulo, our friend from Microsoft who introduced internal podcasting at Microsoft which was a great inspiration to us. He just tweeted a video about how the made people listening to a 5 minute podcast.

Well done Paulo. Could that fly in pharma companies too?


Yep, I finally got one in my hands

Say no more, it’s… gorgeous…

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