DigiRedo’s New Media session at FECAVA congress – follow us LIVE!

Currently we’re in Istanbul at the FECAVA congress, an international veterinary congress. FECAVA is the Federation for European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations. Most of the congress is about clinical subjects like dentistry, internal medicine and radiology. But also the veterinarian needs to realize the importance of communication and the impact of new and social media. And the opportunities they bring.

This afternoon, starting around 2pm, one of the sessions will be entirely dedicated to new media and what the veterinarian can do with it. Together with FECAVA we’ve organized this session, which exists of three presentations: I will start with a presentation with an introduction on new media followed by Susie Samuel from Vethelpdirect, who will talk about how you can use new and social media in the veterinary practice. After the break Erik will talk about online communities. The session will be closed with an open discussion with the audience, a bit unconference-like, where everybody can share their opinion, thoughts and doubts about the use of new and social media for the veterinary practice.

In the meantime we will encourage people to use Twitter (#fecava11). The session will streamed live and can be followed live here.

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Interview Guy Kawasaki – Marketing Pioneers 2011 Congress

There are only so many people we want to have in front of our camera to interview. We were lucky that we’ve already had some great people ‘captured forever’ in the digital format, and now we can add another ‘Guru’ to our Hall of Fame: Guy Kawasaki. On the Marketing Pioneers Congress last week  he presented his new book ‘Enchantment’ and we had a chance to have a short interview with him. Obviously, we grabbed this chance with both hands. An interview about enchantment, ‘Dutch drop’, Facebook pages, MAP and pioneering.

What makes a person a ‘Marketing Pioneer’?
Kawasaki: “If you dare to use new technologies before they become mainstream. Currently these are Twitter and Facebook, but think also Gowalla, Foursquare and Loopt. Think also about the impact Groupon has. What does this mean, really? And there’s lots of work to be done in analytics; which value does your initiatives on Facebook provide you? Many followers is not equal to high impact.

Are you a Marketing Pioneer yourself?
“Well, I’m for sure no laggard. I am not the first in everything. I started late with Twitter and blogging”

And Apple. How did Apple change the way you look at innovation?
“Working at Apple completely changed my view on reality. I learned from Steve Jobs that a really good product must have a good user interface, that this is important for many people. And not only the price is important. I have also learned that a good product does not necessarily mean best sales. After all, the Mac has only 10% market share.

Doing new stuff, pioneering within a large organization. What is the biggest challenge for people who want to pioneer. What tips do you have?
Ask forgiveness instead of permission. Don’t go to the VP-level. The higher you go in an organization, the thinner the air. The thinner the air, the more difficult it is to support intelligent life.”

Your new book, “Enchantment”. What’s your elevator pitch, taking into account that the buildings in Holland are not very tall.
“Enchantment helps you to capture the heart and soul of people. It helps to please people, so that they become loyal customers.”

What’s the difference between enchantment and evangelism?
“Evangelizing is selling on the basis of a dream. Enchantment is about total relationships; you do not only buy a Mac, but everything: the iPhone, iPad, i-whatever. Anything that comes out of the pipeline of Apple. Enchantment is a higher level of delight.”

How do you enchant your employees?
The best way is MAP: Mastery – making sure employees master what they are doing, Autonomy – empower the employees, give them freedom to choose, and Purpose – make their work meaningful. This things are as important, if not more important, than money.”

Where can we find your book?
“Funny. This really is a marketing question. I had to choose between a website for the book, or a Facebook page. I chose for the Facebook page. There are so many advantages having a Facebook page. You have less evil hate-filled people and spammers. Most people are who they are on Facebook, that provides a buffering effect. Links are built-in, pictures, status updates. It’s a nice controlled garden or a product such as my book.”

Social Media defeats e-mail

Last week I read an interesting article about the use of social media in comparison with e-mail. Although I do find myself still e-mailing a lot (too much!) apparently e-mail is degrading to a secondary form of communication:

On the PC e-mail is still ruling for communication purposes. On the mobile phone however, mail has been surpassed by social media. From recent research executed by the UK-based company TNS it appears that we use social networks such as Facebook and Twitter a factor 1.4 more than e-mailing. On average we spend 3.1 hours to these services, whereas e-mail gets only 2.2 hours of our attention span. In addition, all respondents indicated that they will use much more social media on their mobile phone. The PC is being switched off.

According to the researchers the popularity of social media on mobile phones have to do with ‘instant gratification’, such as short messages being sent and read. Next to that, the variety of communication is appealing to many: public messages, private messages, video, pictures, status updates, geo-locations. Much more attractive than a simple e-mail. The number of users is increasing dramatically as well, mainly due to the enormous uptake of smartphones such as the iPhone or Android. It is expected that next year more smartphones are being sold than ‘normal’ mobile phones (shall we call them ‘dumb’ phones?).

The biggest users of social media are found in emerging markets by the way, such as Malaysia, Russia and Thailand. On average people in these countries spend 8 hours per week on social networks. In the west of the world this average is much lower. According to TNS this is due to the fact that we see the internet as ‘normal’, a given. In emerging markets people are grateful for each new form of communication.

Punch line of the story: we are a bunch of spoiled kids not realizing the power we have in our hands.

Today is World Rabies Day!

Today, 28 september 2010, is  World Rabies Day. World Rabies Day is an initiative of the Global Allience for Rabies Control and their mission is to raise awareness about the impact of human and animal rabies, how easy it is to prevent it, and how to eliminate the main global sources.

Through a selection events (of which World Rabies Day is one of the annual highlights) WRD has reached over 100 million people and vaccinated over 3 million animals against rabies. Despite that, 50.000 people still die annually of rabies, most of which are children. One of the vaccination campaigns is the Afya Serengeti project of which we reported here before. Aim of this project is to vaccinate all privatly owned dogs that live in the villages and communities surrounding the Serengeti Park in Tanzania. And with succes, as outbreaks of rabies has not been seen in areas where more than 70% of dogs are vaccinated since the start of the campaign in 2003. One of our clients, Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health has supported this campaign the last couple of years by donating a dose of rabies to the project for every dose of vaccine sold. We’ve made a videoseries in 2008 about the campaign to give you an impression of the effort made by the team. This campaign was nominated for the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Award 2009 by the Royal Dutch Veterinary Association.

WRD uses various social media tools to promote their activities like Twitter and Facebook. In addition to that they use video and webinars for educational purposes. Today, for examples, they organize throughout the day 4 webinars. Besides that, you can also demonstrate your support to WRD by sending specially developed  Health eCards or by placing special buttons on your website or below your email messages. No matter how small, it’s one step closer to the ultimate goal: a world free of rabies.

Just registered for Medicine 2.0

A friend of mine reminded me on the annual Medicine 2.0 conference in Maastricht. From their website:

Medicine 2.0 is the annual open, international conference on Web 2.0 applications in health and medicine, also known as the World Congress on Social Networking and Web 2.0 Applications in Medicine, Health, Health Care, and Biomedical Research.
The congress is organized and co-sponsored by the Journal of Medical Internet Research, the International Medical Informatics Association, the Centre for Global eHealth InnovationCHIRAD, and a number of other sponsoring organizations.

This conference distinguishes itself from “Health 2.0” tradeshows by having an academic form and focus, with an open call for presentations, published proceedings and peer-reviewed abstracts (although there is also a non-peer reviewed practice and business track), and being the only conference in this field which has a global perspective and an international audience (last year there were participants from 18 countries).
An academic approach to the topic also means that we aim to look “beyond the health 2.0 hype”, trying to identify the evidence on what works and what doesn’t, and have open and honest discussions.

Medicine 2.0 ’08 and ’09 sold out with almost 200 participants each, and were praised to have an outstanding program, with internationally renowned speakers, a philosophy of “openess”, and a very conducive atmosphere for discussions and networking.

The University of Twente (UT), the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (UMCN) and the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) will host Medicine 2.0 Europe on November 29-30, 2010 in Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Medicine 2.0’10 will umbrealla REshape (Fall ed., UMCN) and the ‘Supporting health by technology’ (IIIrd ed) symposium series (Univ. of Twente, RIVM). Evidently, the focus is on the impact and significance of Web 2.0 on health, health care and research. This incredibly important, prospering and promising field of interest deserves an open and collaborative European forum.

Looks interesting and I heard various good stories about it. Let’s have a look. If you want to join, decide fast. There are only 200 seats available.

SXSW 2010: Brian Solis – Organizations need to socialize

Social Media has changed the communication landscape and also the world of business has noticed that. But a Facebook group or a Twitter account is no guarantee for successful participation in the communities of your customers. To achieve that you need to do more. “You need to engage”, according to Brian Solis, Prinicpal at Futureworks and one of the prominent thought leaders in social media.

“As a company or as a brand you need to participate in the conversations in such manner that your not only of added value, but that you also involve your customers in your marketing and service activities.” Because of that social media will have an enormous impact in the organsational structure of a company. “Any division within an organization that is effected by outside influence is goiung to have to socialize”.  Eventually social media instruments will become aminstream as email is today, but before that organisations will need to go through a process of cultural change.

Brian was at SXSW to promote his latest book ‘Engage’, in his words the book that starts where the current scial media books stop. “There is not a single book that goes into this depth, that tells you how to apply social media to your job, how to get resources, how to measure it and how to get support.” We spoke with Brian about his book, about cultural change and about SXSW 2010.

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